Badge: Girl Scout Traditions

GST_08T_URLAs Girl Scouts reach and pass their first centennial, looking back to where we have been gives us an idea of the accomplishments that have been made by one person’s vision — Juliette Gordon Low. The Girl Scout Traditions badge set allows you to explore not only each level available as of 2012, but also general traditions that have been developed by Girl Scouts worldwide for generations.

NOTE: Read through the steps below. Note any resources that you might need to complete this badge program. Check SUPP_GS_Traditions_Glance.pdf for a listing of all Girl Scout Traditions supplements. If you need resources beyond what is provided, check your Service Unit and Council archives. You can also check with other leaders for assistance with acquiring materials.

__________________________________________________________________________

Girl Scouts is full of traditions — from the songs we sing to the ceremonies we use to celebrate achievements. This badge program can be used with any other of the Girl Scout Traditions set to provide event activities for your troop / group.

 .

 

Steps

 .

Explore traditions

1. Tradition of acceptance

Perhaps because of a woman being treated as less than a man, Girl Scouts has always embraced girls as individuals. Girl Scouts supports and teaches each girl to reach for her unique goals. While society struggles to look past skin color, religion, and other characteristics, we place the needs of each girl first. We celebrate the victories and provide support during failures, encouraging a “try again” attitude. Share a story of a girl that you helped gain acceptance of herself or encouraged to grow beyond what she thought she could do.

2. Leadership.

From girls who succeed personally in their own lives to women who leave Girl Scouts to start their own youth groups, you can see the teachings of leadership take hold. Every Girl Scout, past and present, leads with courage, confidence and character. Share how you have taken the lead of a project, group or idea and made it your own.

3. Embracing change.

The world is constantly changing. Girl Scouts understands this and frequently updates or provides supplemental programming to cover new trends and movements. As you learn and grow, you are also changing. Examine your own life. How has Girl Scouts changed you?

 .

Explore skills

4. Holidays.

Explore and celebrate one or more of these Girl Scout holidays in a traditional way.

  • Founder’s Day / Juliette Low’s Birthday
  • Girl Scout Anniversary
  • Girl Scout Leader’s Day
  • Girl Scout Sunday / Sabbath
  • Girl Scout Week
  • World Thinking Day

5. Cookies.

Originally, selling cookies was merely a money earning project. Today, it is an extension of business as girls make decisions and goals, working to do more than just “sell cookies.” Try one or more of these to explore traditions with cookies.

  • Make the original Girl Scout cookie recipe
  • Host a cookie rally
  • Participate in a sale, doing door-to-door and booth sales
  • Explore other ways girls have sold cookies
  • Make recipes with cookies as an ingredient

6. Other money earning traditions.

Calendar sales started through necessity when ingredients were unavailable to make cookies during war years. Today, girls may sell calendars, nuts or magazines for additional funds in the fall when their year starts. Explore ways girls have earned money for their troop and plan to do something new with your earnings.

7. Camping.

After selling cookies, most people relate Girl Scouts to camping. Camping has changed drastically from the beginning of Girl Scouts. While we still recycle items to make things for camp, we no longer damage foliage to create items to use at camp. Explore items Girl Scouts have made over the years to use at camp. Make one or more and try them out.

8. Participation.

Even in the early days of Girl Scouts, troops weren’t the only way to participate. Due to the rural areas of many places in the US, independent Girl Scouts could join. Today, we have even more ways to be a Girl Scout. Explore our current pathways and find out more about each.

9. Insignia and uniforms.

Original badges were referred to as “merit badges” or “proficiency badges.” As the years went on, they changed to reflect the levels of the girls, giving us “petals”, “try-its”, and “interest projects” to name a few. In 2012, we’re going back to badges for all levels with the exception of Daisies. Explore insignia and uniforms from the past 100 years.

10. Girl Scout levels.

In 1912, Girl Scouts were girls aged 10 and older. As the materials and abilities of the girls were understood, the levels were broken down and today we have six levels of girls. This makes it easier to work with the girls as they are more likely to have the same skill set. Explore the development of one of the six levels of Girl Scouts through the appropriate Girl Scout Traditions for that level.

11. Meetings and events.

Meetings encompass a lot of traditions from how they’re run to activities done during a meeting or event. Explore one or more of these traditions and share them with others.

  • Kaper charts
  • Forms
  • Badge requirements
  • Field trips
  • Encouraging participation of string female role models
  • Government
  • Ceremonies
  • Skills
  • Games
  • Songs
  • Sports

This is only a small list. Feel free to add your own traditional experience if you wish.

12. Take action.

Take one or more of the traditions you have explored and look at it more in depth. Which Girl Scout levels will be able to do your tradition? Think of how you can incorporate it into a meeting or event. Try the tradition with a few girls and see what adjustments you need to make so your ideas can be used with a larger number of girls. Do your tradition with a larger group or share it with others.

13. Making traditions.

From starting an annual World Thinking Day event to doing a special ceremony for Gold Award winners, making your own tradition isn’t difficult. It’s keeping the tradition going that is the challenge. Brainstorm traditions you feel would benefit your girls or community. Discuss with other Girl Scout to determine the plausibility of your plan. Follow through and start your tradition.

 .

Supplements Available

SUPP_GS_Traditions_Glance.pdf

 .

Sites to Explore

 

To download a PDF of this badge program, click here: EP_GS_T08_Traditions

Badge: Girl Scout Traditions – Ambassador

GST_06A_URLAs Girl Scouts reach and pass their first centennial, looking back to where we have been gives us an idea of the accomplishments that have been made by one person’s vision — Juliette Gordon Low. The Girl Scout Traditions badge set allows you to explore not only each level available as of 2012, but also general traditions that have been developed by Girl Scouts worldwide for generations.

NOTE: Read through the steps below. Note any resources that you might need to complete this badge program. Check SUPP_GS_Traditions_Glance.pdf for a listing of all Girl Scout Traditions supplements. If you need resources beyond what is provided, check your Service Unit and Council archives. You can also check with other leaders for assistance with acquiring materials.

__________________________________________________________________________

Girl Scout Ambassadors are girls in grades 11 and 12. Explore their past and future with this badge program.

 .

 

Steps

Exploring the past

1. Starting of Girl Scout Ambassadors.

Girl Scout Seniors have been mentioned from the beginning. The ages for our current Ambassador program fell within the ages of the Senior Girl Scouts. In 1937, Senior Girl Scouts were recognized as their own level for girls 14-17 and official uniforms were available. In 2008, Seniors and Ambassadors were split from the previous “Seniors” level so each covers two grades. Ambassadors, while being our latest level, is in name only. Review how the Girl Scout Ambassador program grew from Senior Girl Scouts.

2. Decade sampler.

Do at least one activity per decade (1912 to present) to experience what Girl Scouts did in the past as Girl Scout Ambassadors. Find information from one of these:

  • Handbooks (badge requirements, things to do, activities)
  • Leader’s Guides (things to do, activities)
  • GSUSA supplemental materials
  • Local “council own” badges / programs
  • Historical Girl Scout YouTube videos
  • Girl Scout Alumnae
  • Supplements for the Girl Scout Traditions badge set (AEP)

If you cannot find Girl Scout specific activities, try some of the activities listed in Step 4. For additional ideas, see the badge program “Girl Scout Traditions” for non-level activities and materials.

3. Adapting to the times.

Some of the activities may not correspond to beliefs or resources we have today. Find an activity, or more than one, and look for an equivalent you might do today. Adapt your activity if there is no updated equivalent so girls today can try it. Share your final activity with others.

4. History sampler.

Experience the world as the girls did in the past. You can do one or more of the following:

  • Watch a period movie
  • Watch newsreel reports that used to run before movies
  • Listen to old radio station broadcasts
  • Historical reenactments
  • Educational activities
  • Local events
  • Conduct research at your local library
  • Trends at that time including music, fashion, popular activities, etc.

Feel free to do other activities that give you a sense of the history of Girl Scout Ambassadors.

5. Earn insignia.

Completely earn one badge from your level doing the requirements from at least ten years ago. If there is no badge, try some of the activities they did to see if any can be used with your girls today. Look for a badge to wear or create a charm or other item that illustrates the requirements / activities you did to show your proficiency. If you find activities that you enjoy more than the badge(s) at your own level, share them with others.

6. Earn patches.

Girl Scouts partners with many organizations to provide current materials for girls. They also create a lot on their own. Review patch programs that were available in the past and earn one that would have been done by Girl Scout Ambassadors. Again, try to find a patch to wear or create a charm or other item to show your proficiency.

7. Additional awards.

Explore any additional awards girls at your level may have earned. This might include higher awards, bridging awards and participatory awards. How have these changed over the years?

8. My own experience.

Girl Scout Alumnae are adults that were previously with GSUSA but may not now be active. Review your own experiences with Girl Scouts. Collect stories / items you might want to share with new Girl Scouts.

9. Troop event.

Prepare a troop event to share what you learned with your girls while exploring the past.

10. Larger event.

Work with a group of adults to create and offer an event outside your own troop / group. Use the materials you have found while exploring the past or start a new tradition.

 .

Moving to the future

11. Explore badges.

Review the Girl’s Guide for Girl Scouting for your level. Review and do one badge for your level. How does it compare with insignia that could previously be earned?

12. Explore Journeys.

Review at least one of the Journeys. How might you customize it to make it more palatable to girls at your level? Brainstorm ideas and put them inside your Journey so you have them when you review the Journeys with your girls.

13. Create your own badge.

Share the excitement of changing the world. Challenge yourself to create a badge program that you feel girls at your level might enjoy. Ask your girls to review your badge and make suggestions for improvement. Offer it to others outside your normal troop / group.

 .

Supplements Available

SUPP_GS_Traditions_Glance.pdf

 .

Sites to Explore

 

To download a PDF of this badge program, click here: EP_GS_T06_Ambassadors

Wanted: Your Materials

**Calling All Girl Scouts and Girl Scout Alumnae**

As I’m working to finish up adding the last of my own materials for Girl Scout Traditions, I’m asking for your help.

I want to add more council-specific and individual-specific flavor to our set of supplements. If you haven’t checked out the resources available so far, go to our Girl Scout Printable collection on Scribd.

http://www.scribd.com/collections/2837586/SUPP-AEP-Girl-Scouts-Printables

Look back over your own years interacting with Girl Scouts. Ask your girls about their own experiences as well. I don’t want current programming ideas. I want things that were done in the past to help add to our collective history.

Specific items I’m looking for include:

.

Girl Scout Stories

I’d like to create a PDF file specific for each individual who contributes stories of their experiences. I created one for myself to give you an example, SUPP_GS_My Stories_larajla.pdf. Please include your name so the stories can be attributed to you.

.

Council Owns

I have done nothing on these. While I have my girls’ favorites, I’d love to have requirements / experiences you’ve had with them with your girls. I’m especially interested in the ones based on the geography / location-specific ones in your council.

.

My Council

Realignment was hard on everyone. I’d love to get information on defunct councils, powerful women who helped make their mark in your local councils and service units, etc.

.

My Camp

Everyone has a camp they love. Stories of your own, history of the camp, ghost stories shared over the fire, humorous stories of items not packed for camp, anything that could be used to bring the memories of your camp to others. If I can collect enough about a specific camp, I’ll create a PDF for that camp. If not, I’ll work to create a collection of camp stories.

.

Shared Information

The Web has offered a way for us to share information between councils that we didn’t have before. Previously, we’d share within our council or service unit . . . often mimeographed typewritten pages. I’d love copies of these materials as there are gems that can be shared from craft to programming ideas. These individual insights into the national program help build our history. You’ll see some that I’ve already done from Riverland Council in 1983 in our supplement set. Files start with “SUPP_1983_”.

.

Okay, so for the hard part!

You can email any of these items to me at larajla__@__gmail.com (remove underscores). I can get to this email address anywhere, so it’s the easiest for me to work with.

You can type up the information and send it in an email. If you want to do an attachment, please save it as a TXT file, which is the most universal text file type.

Also, if you have access to a newer photocopier, some give you the ability to create PDFs to email. You might want to check with your local office supply store to see if they can do this for you. If you choose to do this, make sure you send a copy back to yourself so you have the information for your own records.

Thank you!

P.S. Please forward this to anyone you feel might have information to share.