Badge: Photo Scavenger Hunt – Youth

PSHunt_Youth_URLThis badge program builds upon Photo Scavenger Hunt, incorporating specifics for adjusting a scavenger hunt for younger kids as well as highlighting possible themes / lists you can use for a hunt designed for their age group.

 

Steps

Adjustments for youth

1. Supervisory adults.
Each team will need at least one adult – two are recommended. In case of emergency, this allows one adult to respond while one gets help / keeps the rest of the kids together. Often, you’ll be able to get parents to volunteer as long as they know the length of time they’re needed and what you expect them to do. All pre-teens should have supervision at all times. Determine the radio of adults to kids for your hunt.

2. Limited location.
When you are having a photo scavenger hunt for kids, you need to limit your location area. A single park, indoor shopping mall, etc. is a good place for younger kids as they are in a contained area and drivers are not needed. Brainstorm places locally where you might be able to host a hunt for kids.

NOTE: If you decide to do a larger area that requires transportation for your kids, be aware of state and federal regulations as you may need to acquire a safety seat for each child. The vehicle size may restrict the size of your teams.

3. Limited duration.
The optimum duration of your hunt is dependent on the age / maturity of your audience. Plan to find no more than two items for every year of their average age. Very young kids (preschoolers) have a shorter attention span than a sixth grader. Decide if you are going to limit your participants to one or two ages or if you’re going to make teams with older and younger kids within the pre-teen years so that the older kids can help / encourage the younger ones.

4. The list.
Some of your participants may not be able to read. You could provide photos / sketches for them or actual colors / shapes to find. Think of other ways to make the list more accessible to younger scavengers.

5. Incorporating storytelling.
Everyone loves a good story, especially kids. If you can find or create a story to go with your hunt, it becomes more interesting to your scavengers. Look through books and cartoons, or look online to help craft storylines.

 

Themes for youth

6. Alphabets.
For kids, alphabets are a great way to reinforce their knowledge. You might ask for a photo of each letter alone or create unique alphabet with the letters they find.

You can give them a list of letters and have them take pictures of items that begin with the letter and write the word down that goes with the photo. Bonus points might be awarded for getting more than one thing that begins with that letter.

Lastly, you can make it more challenging by limiting what they can photograph. For example, you might have them take pictures of street signs with street names that begin with the different letters of the alphabet.

What other ways could you use alphabets in a photo scavenger hunt?

7. Animals.
Everyone loves animals. Local zoos or farms would allow you to keep the kids in a limited area while still giving them the ability to explore. You will need to visit the area before the hunt to make sure your list covers the animals available for photos.

For an animal scavenger hunt, you might provide silhouettes for them to interpret and find the animal that match. You might give animal names. Instead of naming the animals, you define the animals differently by age, family group or habitat. Brainstorm ways to incorporate animals into a scavenger hunt.

8. Art and sculpture.
Does your town encourage the arts? Do they have an art museum or an exhibit in your area? Do they have sculptures or other pieces of art in public locations? Does your local school or church display art created by the kids? By asking for photos of different types of art, shapes, colors or techniques (for the more advanced), you can find a multitude of ways of using art for a photo scavenger hunt.

You may even want to turn this around by asking the kids to take photos of their area and then creating a collage of all the photos. Identify items within the photos and have them search the collage for those items. What other ways can you think of using art for a photo scavenger hunt?

9. Color.
Color is a great thing for kids to find on a scavenger hunt. You can use pieces of construction paper to identify the colors if your age group can’t yet read.

Photo scavenger hunts can revolve around one color or taking pictures of multiple colors. You can use this to start a discussion on variations within a color. Alternately, you can take the photos once the kids take them of a single color and ask them to arrange them from lightest to darkest. How else might you use colors on a scavenger hunt?

10. Food.
All kids can relate to food. Whether in a supermarket, farmer’s market or a food court, there are a lot of food items that can be photographed. You may want to have the kids identify vegetables or fruits by color, shape or texture. Travel to local shops and find out what they have available. You might even be able to add an element or two to make it more fun like a stuffed bunny holding a carrot for one of your vegetables.

11. Shapes.
Shapes give you another easy way to run a photo scavenger hunt. It allows the kids to explore the ways shapes are used in signs, architecture and more. Show photos of one shape or a variety to show what you expect. What might you do with the photographed shapes the kids take?

12. Holidays.
Holidays are a great time to take photos. People decorate their yards, public buildings put up displays and schools feature all sorts of items made by their students. There are a lot of photo opportunities.

Some ideas for a holiday-themed hunt include:

  • Tree ornaments
  • Easter eggs
  • Hidden hearts
  • Elements that visually represent the holiday
  • People celebrating the holiday

You can also use the resulting photos to discuss social interaction and the different ways people celebrate. Place the photos to create a large advent calendar. The kids can discuss what the photos mean to them as every family celebrates certain holidays and they each have experiences to share. Select a holiday and create a scavenger hunt from one of these choices or create your own.

13. Other interests.
What other things are your kids interested in that you can adapt to a photo scavenger hunt? It might be cartoons they see on television that they can find represented in merchandise. Perhaps their favorite places to visit in your town could be adapted into a hunt. Discuss the possibilities with pre-teen kids.

14. Placed items.
Make or purchase items to place in your area. Create a story for your teams – a reason why they are going on the hunt – and let them go. Placed items for them to find might include:

  • Fairies
  • Small cars
  • Certain type of flower
  • Ribbons
  • Entire outfit of clothing
  • Yard gnomes
  • Plastic flamingos
  • Painted rocks
  • Monster prints

Small placed items are a great for indoor hunts.

15. Follow your own drum.
You do not need to have a theme for a successful hunt. Look around your location and choose items that you spot and put them on your list. Don’t make them all easy.

16. Do it!
Create a scavenger hunt for one of the themes (Steps 6-15) and run it. Use the “Photo Scavenger Hunt” badge program if you need steps to follow.

 

 

Supplements Available

SUPP_PSH_ActionHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_AlphabetHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_AnimalHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_ArtHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_ColorHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_CommunityHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_FoodHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_HolidayHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_NatureHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_NightHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_PhotoSkillsHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_PlacedItemHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_PropHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_PuzzleHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_ShapeHunts.pdf

 

Sites to Explore

NOTE: Also see links on “Photo Scavenger Hunt” badge program for more ideas.

 

To download a PDF of this badge program, click here: EP_Photo SH_Youth

Badge: Photo Scavenger Hunt – Adult

PSHunt_Adult_URLThis badge program builds upon Photo Scavenger Hunt, incorporating specifics for adjusting a scavenger hunt for adults as well as highlighting possible themes / lists you can use for a hunt designed for a mature group of scavengers.

 

 

Steps

Adjustments for adults

1. Limited by your imagination.
With adults, you have minimal restrictions. Your area can be as large as you wish. You can define times and rules, meeting only when all of the photos are uploaded and the awards decided. Brainstorm the kinds of photo scavenger hunts you might want to do with adult scavengers.

2. Keep it tasteful.
In searching the Web, many of the items include provocative and sometimes distasteful items to be completed. Not all adults are uninhibited. If you are unsure whether your scavengers are willing to go beyond silly and fun, check with them or err on the side of caution and keep your hunt clean.

3. Pay to play.
If your adults pay to be part of a scavenger hunt, you need to give them something in return. Instead of ribbons and certificates that you might give kids as awards, start your brainstorming with gift cards and cash prizes. You could create a yearly event with a large cash prize going to the winner. Think of ways you might promote this type of photo scavenger hunt and the awards you might be able to give.

4. Fundraiser.
A photo scavenger hunt can be run as a fundraiser with scavengers paying to participate and businesses donating items to help bring money into a cause. Look at ways you might be able to turn a scavenger hunt into a fundraiser. Query your friends and see if they would be willing to participate.

5. Weekend event.
Plan a scavenger hunt over a long weekend. Ask adults to form their own teams depending on what time during the weekend is good for them. Let teams gather and snap away. Upload all files online and meet up Sunday for dinner, discussions and awards. Does this flexibility work better for your scavengers?

 

Themes for adults

6. Extreme close-ups.
Take extreme close-ups of an item. Provide these close-ups as the “list” of things to find. The team will need to guess what it is and photograph the entire item. Try a few to see if this is something you think adults would enjoy.

7. Creative comparisons.
Ask your teams to be creative in their photos. If you’re taking a picture of a person, don’t take a full body shot. Instead try a head shot, silhouette, etc. Compare your photos when the hunt is complete and decide which views are the best.

8. Perspective challenge.
You may need to scour the Internet for ideas on this one. Look for ways to create photos that play with perspective. For example, one team member can hold out their hand and another is further back and looks like she is standing on the hand. Ask a team member to bend down and take a shot from an angle so it looks like he doesn’t have a head. Create your own list of ten or more perspective challenges.

9. Logos.
Provide a list that is nothing but logos from your area. The teams need to find the establishment / product and snap a picture of it. You can make this more difficult by removing part of the logo. Look at local logos to determine which would be easy to spot and which would be difficult.

10. Landscapes.
All photos for this hunt must be in the form of landscapes. Your items will need to be larger so they can be recognized within the landscape shot. If you’re asked for a picture of a cow, it needs to be with a background of the field. Try identifying an item or two and taking pictures where the item is still recognizable in the landscape.

11. Quantity is key.
Select a single item (color, shape, vehicle, footwear, etc.) and collect as many pictures with that item in it as you can. For example a triangle might be a yield sign, but it also might be an architectural element. Award points for the most photos. Pick an item and give yourself five minutes to see how many you can spot as a test.

12. Group shots.
Adults are less inhibited about asking strangers to take shots of the group. Give your teams a list of shots they need to make with all members of the group. You might have them acting out scenes from a selection of movies, recreating pieces of art or posing in unusual ways. Give extra points for non-members and use of on-site items.

13. Find the most.
Give your team a list of items and have them find a way to make it the “most.” For a famous person, have them find the most famous person they can. For a tall building, find the tallest building. For an old car, have them find the oldest car. This stretches from merely finding an item to finding a better one. Ask them to upload the “most” items only. The teams can vote on each listed item to determine a winning team.

14. Children’s games.
Think of the games you played as a child and pick one such as Charades or Statues. Give your teams a list of places they have to play the games. The photos highlight the most embarrassing moments of playing the game at each location. Brainstorm games that you think would fit this theme.

15. Pulling from other badge programs.
If none of these themes sound good to you, check out “Photo Scavenger Hunt: Youth” and “Photo Scavenger Hunt: Teen” for more ideas.

16. Do it!
Create a scavenger hunt for your theme and run it. Use the “Photo Scavenger Hunt” badge program if you need steps to follow.

 

 

Supplements Available

SUPP_PSH_ActionHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_AlphabetHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_AnimalHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_ArtHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_ColorHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_CommunityHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_FoodHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_HolidayHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_NatureHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_NightHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_PhotoSkillsHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_PlacedItemHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_PropHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_PuzzleHunts.pdf

SUPP_PSH_ShapeHunts.pdf

 

Sites to Explore

NOTE: Also see links on “Photo Scavenger Hunt” badge program for more ideas.

 

To download a PDF of this badge program, click here: EP_Photo SH_Adult

New Supplements Available Now!

I have started uploading the new supplements for Girl Scout Traditions. You can find all of our Girl Scout supplements here.

Printables: World Games has also had supplements added. The badge program is coming out next month.

I like to print the world games out and give them to teachers as a gift. The time of year when the kids can’t go outside to play is here. The printable games give the kids something to break from their daily work and allow them to be indoors for recess / lunch. Some of the games need a print each time they are played. Some are reusable.

Happy Holidays!

Badge: DNR – Project Learning Tree

PLT_URLProject Learning Tree (PLT) is an environmental education program for kids from preschool through grade 12. It is from the American Forest Foundation.

 

 

Steps

 

1. Project Learning Tree (PLT).
www.plt.org
Project Learning Tree is designed to get kids outside. The purpose is to teach kids HOW to think about the environment. Explore the Web site to learn more.

2. GreenWorks!
www.plt.org/greenworks
GreenWorks! provides the framework for service learning in cooperation with businesses, non-profits, etc. Review the guidelines and brainstorm ways you can incorporate PLT activities / service into your current programming.

3. GreenSchools!
www.plt.org/greenschools
GreenSchools! encourages positive environmental action of schools and communities. Review this program and decide if you want to reduce your school’s ecological footprint. These activities can be incorporated into normal school days. How much can you do to help the environment?

4. Try an activity.
Free activities are available online. Try one or more to see how the program works. Is this something you can use with your youth troop / group?

5. Take a PLT workshop.
Search for your state coordinator and / or events to find out when workshops are being offered. Sign up and take one.

6. Earth and Sky radio show.
earthsky.org
Earth and Sky is a daily radio show that highlights a range of environmental topics. Go to the Earth and Sky Web site and look through some of their offerings. Do a tutorial if you are interested in this resource.

7. Focus on forests.
www.plt.org/focus-on-forests
Exploring Environmental Issues: Focus on Forests module is now available. Learn about forestry. Explore the links and resources to find activities you can use with your youth.

8. Look through the curriculum.
Review the curriculum to find other items not specifically called out in the steps of this badge program. Are there more areas you’re interested in learning about? If so, find out more.

9. Additional resources of PLT activities.
www.plt.org/curriculum
Under “Curriculum”, explore the additional activity resources for both PreK-8 and Secondary.

10. Incorporating PLT with Girl Scouts.
www.plt.org/correlations-for-girl-scouts
PLT has activities that work with all levels of Girl Scouts. Look through their provided lists to see what activities you can incorporate into your Girl Scout activities.

11. Incorporating PLT with Boy Scouts.
www.plt.org/correlations-for-boy-scouts
Look through activities to find out how to incorporate PLT activities with Boy Scout activities.

12. Create an activity box.
Create an activity box based on the program / youth you work with to introduce adults to Project Learning Tree. Include instructions on how the activity works and where adults can get their own materials if they are interested in learning more.

13. Environmental education.
connect.plt.org/app/render/go.aspx?xsl=tp_community.xslt
PLT provides even more educational support. Check out their site where they encourage others to share their PLT materials.

14. Become a trainer or coordinator.
Find out what you need to do to become a trainer / coordinator for Project Learning Tree.

15. Explore ways to share PLT.
Find ways to share Project Learning Tree with others beyond the steps above.

 

Sites to Explore

All links are provided within the steps above.

 

To download a PDF of this badge program, click here: EP_DNR_Project LT